Traveling Exhibit Shows History of Truck Farming in Mississippi at the Columbus-Lowndes Public Library

An exhibit featuring historical photographs documenting the early days of truck farming in Mississippi will be on display at the Columbus-Lowndes Public Library from May 4 to June 22, 2012.

“Through the Lens: Copiah County Truck Farming” showcases the work of Luther M. Hamilton (1869-1944), a native of Crystal Springs.

Hamilton’s striking photographs of early 1900s truck farming capture workers in cabbage and tomato fields, trucks lined up to unload at a train depot, and scenes of downtown Crystal Springs and its residents.

Truck Farming – growing large crops of fruits or vegetables to be shipped to distant markets– originated around 1874 in Copiah County. It proved to be an effective way to diversify the state’s agricultural economy and lower the financial risk of the many Mississippians who had previously depended on the volatile cotton market. Its success led to many other communities in Mississippi following the lead of Copiah County and beginning their own truck farming operations.

“Through the Lens: Copiah County Truck Farming:” was produced by the Museum Division of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History.

For more information about the exhibit while at the Columbus-Lowndes Public Library call 662-329-5300. For information about other traveling exhibits available through the Mississippi Department of Archives and History call 601-576-6800.

Advertisements
Published in: on May 23, 2012 at 3:13 pm  Leave a Comment  

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://lowndeslibarchives.wordpress.com/2012/05/23/traveling-exhibit-shows-history-of-truck-farming-in-mississippi-at-the-columbus-lowndes-public-library/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: